Nuclear Diamond Battery

Can you imagine a world where you don’t have to charge or change batteries on your remote devices, smartwatches, or any device from EVs to cellphones?

Nuclear Diamond Battery

According to certain firms, nuclear diamond battery technology can kill two birds with one stone: it can create energy storage that can last thousands of years while also reusing nuclear waste…
Is this the next major advancement in battery technology, or is it simply hype?
Furthermore, is it safe? 

The concept of a nuclear diamond battery was created and presented for the first time in 2016 by scientists at the University of Bristol. Professor Tom Scott described in a speech how his team developed a synthetic diamond capable of generating a small electric current when put in a radioactive field. The resultant battery is practically self-charging, as the diamond may generate a charge when put near a radioactive source.

The diamond battery is a betavoltaic solar cell, similar to a photovoltaic solar cell, except that it converts beta radiation (rather than light) to energy. Chemical vapor deposition is used to create diamond films at high temperatures using C-14 methane and hydrogen plasma. The diamond in the battery is composed of thin layers of massive crystalline particles, making it far smaller than the diamond seen on rings. Additionally, this layered construction is intended to limit radiation leakage and reduce the risk to human health.
However, these batteries can generate just a few microwatts of electricity.
Unfortunately, this is not the future of electric cars, and it has the potential to power a small range of gadgets.

These batteries have a theoretical maximum life of 28,000 years.
However, microwatts? That is extremely low, but if several of these battery cells were coupled, they could power some low-power gadgets.
And there are no video demonstrations of the technology available at the moment. However, the promise of the radioactive diamond battery remains very real, and I’m eager to learn more.

Comments on Nuclear Diamond Battery

  1. taran agnew says:

    do these pose a health risk to ppl?

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